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Madeleine Kelly Artist

All Images © Madeleine Kelly 2018.

Hollow Mark, 2011.

Hollow Mark, 2011. The work is partly inspired by contemporary considerations of where painting might begin...

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Hollow Mark.
  • Madeleine Kelly - Hollow Mark Installation View
  • Madeleine Kelly - Structure Forevermore
  • Madeleine Kelly - Erscheinen
  • Madeleine Kelly - Erscheinen and Structure Forevermore
  • Madeleine Kelly - Finders Keepers
  • Madeleine Kelly - Pitting Against The Core Of Me
  • Madeleine Kelly - Plastic Continuity
  • Madeleine Kelly - Plastic Continuity (detail)
  • Madeleine Kelly - Split Unity
  • Madeleine Kelly - Split Unity (detail)
  • Madeleine Kelly - The Grotesque
  • Madeleine Kelly - Seal Clubbers
  • Madeleine Kelly - The End and The Begining
  • Madeleine Kelly - The End and The Begining (detail)
  • Madeleine Kelly - Weight Of The World
  • Madeleine Kelly - Weight Of The World (detail)
  • Madeleine Kelly - Oil Skippers Reduced To A Beat
  • Madeleine Kelly - Oil Skippers Reduced To A Beat (detail)
  • Madeleine Kelly - Disguise The Limit
  • Madeleine Kelly - Hollow Mark Installation View
  • Madeleine Kelly - Hollow Mark Installation View
  • Madeleine Kelly - Hollow Mark Installation View

Hollow Mark, 2011.

The work is partly inspired by contemporary considerations of where painting might begin or end. The title is drawn from Michel Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge (1969) and suggests absence, gaps in knowledge, and things that are unspoken. The work also seeks to test light’s capacity to represent human relations to environments both natural and artificial, as a process of accumulation; an archaeology of being.

The painting uses the image-laden aspects of Foucault’s archaeological metaphor imaginatively to explore complex ways of seeing and knowing. This visual-aesthetic translation of Foucault’s archaeological method is not without irony. Formally, the works contain anamorphic distortions, an emphasis on internal articulation, cultural mapping and biomorphic forms, all arranged as ‘archaeological constellations’.