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Madeleine Kelly Artist

All Images © Madeleine Kelly 2018.

Diversity and Demise, 2017.

Diversity and Demise, 2017. Diversity and Demise. Diversity and Demise: Encounters with pelagic birds and sub-linguistic...

Details

  • Diversity and Demise Installation.
  • Diversity and Demise Installation.
  • Diversity and Demise Installation.
  • Pelagic Birds, 2016.
  • Pelagic Birds, 2016.
  • Pelagic Birds, 2016.
  • Port Kembla, 2016.
  • The Trawler, 2017.
  • The Trawler, 2017.
  • The Trawler, 2017.
  • The Trawler, 2017.
  • The Trawler, 2017.

Diversity and Demise, 2017.

Diversity and Demise.

Diversity and Demise: Encounters with pelagic birds and sub-linguistic form, paintings and sculptures about pelagic birds and the threats that are pushing some species close to extinction. Wollongong City Gallery (11 February – 14 May), Wollongong NSW.

Pelagic birds:
Southern giant-petrel, Northern giant-petrel, Cape petrel, Great-winged petrel, Fairy prion, Fluttering shearwater, Hutton’s shearwater, Wandering albatross, Gibson’s albatross, Black-browed albatross, White-capped albatross, Campbell albatross, Indian yellow-nosed albatross, White-faced storm-petrel (x2), Australasian gannet, Little pied cormorant, Pied cormorant, Little black cormorant, Australian pelican, Silver gull, Crested tern, White-fronted tern, Tern.

Port Kembla (2016)
Port Kembla is a bleak image of the Port Kembla steelworks in which coke ovens, steel-making buildings, stacks, a conveyer gallery and billowing steam serve as structural devices of confinement for abstract figures. At night, gas flares tint the hazy sky peach-pink. A couple convey my perceptual experience of this unique architectural space. With flat square heads carved out of a single brushstroke, the couple possess a haunted air, as if existing solely to inhabit the border that separates real dramatic industry and painted space. Their surreal partnership is watched by a solitary figure. Abstract wedges mirror the perspectival extremes in this inspiring architecture. I love its measured eccentricity and archaic beauty.

The Trawler (2017)
The Trawler is a portrait of human identity and hunger for power. The central figure, shown commanding the space, is an awkward giant with arms that terminate in fishhooks. Her head – a crane that bows clumsily and shamefully over her colossal body – denotes the utilitarian mentality of industrialised fishing, or any factory farming for that matter. Certain geometry abides. Scintillating blocks of colour accumulate throughout her monumental torso, encoding a human face. The motif of the face is repeated, but with each repetition increasingly erased. Around her figure, squares and diamonds form the foundation for ascending albatross. In the background, fishing vessels composed of flat blocks are inspired by artist Kazimir Malevich’s approach to abstraction. My approach to geometric abstraction also recalls the different colour combinations and permutations in the textile iconography of Cusco, Peru, and formally connects to my bird sculptures.